President George Bush Turnpike Western Extension (PGBT-WE) Design-Build, Irving & Grand Prairie, Texas

IEA provided structural, ITS, and electrical engineering services for this $428M design-build project.

Structures: The President George Bush Turnpike Western Extension (PGBT WE) was designed to provide an 11.5-mile link in the growing loop around Dallas. The corridor consisted of the tolled main lanes, recognized as the Western Extension, and the frontage roads, which remain State Highway 161. The new corridor will feature cashless tolling on three main lanes in each direction between SH 183 and Interstate 20. IEA served as part of the Structural Design Team responsible for the design of nine bridges for the SH 161, Phase IV CDA.

The SH 161 bridges included the North & South Bound, 3-span, 212 ft. long, prestressed concrete beam overpass bridges at Mayfield Road, the North & South Bound, 3-span, 186 ft. long, prestressed concrete beam overpass bridges at Warrior Trail, the North & South Bound, 3-span, 243 ft. long, prestressed concrete beam overpass bridges at Pioneer Parkway, the 2-span, 151 ft. long, prestressed concrete beam underpass bridge at Jefferson St., the 2-span, 183 ft. long, prestressed concrete beam underpass bridge at Dalworth St., and a unique 2-span,152 ft. long, prestressed concrete beam underpass utility bridge adjacent to the Union Pacific Railroad underpass bridge.

IEA also performed an independent design check for the curved steel bridges at the South Bound SH 161 to West Bound IH 20 Direct Connector Ramp, the curved steel bridges at the East Bound IH 20 to North Bound SH 161 Direct Connector Ramp, and the curved steel bridges at the West Bound IH 30 to South Bound SH 161 Direct Connector Ramp which were submitted as part of the early steel design package. IEA also performed additional independent design checks for the 2-span, 174 ft. long, prestressed concrete beam underpass bridge at W Tarrant Road, the SH 161 South Bound Mainlane, single span, 150 ft. long, prestressed concrete beam overpass bridge at Kirby Creek, the SH 161 North Bound Mainlane, single span, 150 ft. long, prestressed concrete beam overpass bridge at Kirby Creek, and the SH 161 North Bound Entrance Ramp, 3-span, 278 ft. long, prestressed concrete beam overpass bridge at Kirby Creek.  

Security, Surveillance, and Data Communication System: IEA was the task manager for all toll and ITS related activities for this project. IEA was responsible for the design of the security, surveillance, and data communications systems for the PGBT-WE in the cities of Grand Prairie and Irving, Texas. Design services included 10 toll gantries, 13 electrical service centers, 3 communication huts, 24 CCTV camera towers, 7 Dynamic Message signs, 2 AVI TTS, and approximately 16 miles of communication fiber optic backbone.

Each of the gantry designs included tolling equipment layout, all the civil, structural, electrical, and foundation designs, transfers, loops, electrical service centers, and maintenance access. Each of the gantries were built with VES cabinets, VES cameras, PTZ cameras, AVI antennas, an RF Module with conduits, and equipment support conduits. IEA coordinated with the NTTA’s IT department, their consultants, and the roadway designers to locate the tolling sites and to connect with existing IT infrastructure. The site determination process included the ability to capture the driving public, sight distance, roadway profile, conflicts with existing and future utilities, maintenance access, and other roadway elements.

Each CCTV tower had 5 cameras with full pan-tilt-zoom (PZT) capabilities, 128x zoom and a dome-style environmental enclosure. Video from each of the cameras fed through a digital video recorder and a video network station, which allowed any of the camera images to be viewed by select work stations within the command centre. The fiber optic backbone generally consisted of two single-mode, 144 strand fiber optic cables. The fiber was cut and ended at fiber huts, controlling the fiber along the corridor. Twelve strand fiber lateral splices onto the 114 strand fiber backbone provided data, voice, and video connectivity. This fiber cable system created a robust, reliable and scalable Gigabit Ethernet data network backbone, powered by Cisco Systems technology.